You Probably Don’t Know Shit About the IPO Market…and that’s okay!

//You Probably Don’t Know Shit About the IPO Market…and that’s okay!

You Probably Don’t Know Shit About the IPO Market…and that’s okay!

I always find it interesting the hype that goes into some companies going public.  When The Wife knows about a company going public, that is when you know there is almost too much information flowing from wall street to main street!  I try to ignore the hype, but like anyone who watches the market sometimes you get swept up in the hysteria.  I came across a terrifying list of recent highly publicized IPOs and their returns.

But first…

What is an IPO?

I don’t think it explains much, but damn it do I love this scene from Wolf of Wall Street:

So really, what is an IPO? Both Wikipedia and Investopedia describe it well:

Initial public offering (IPO) or stock market launch is a type of public offering in which shares of a company usually are sold to institutional investors that in turn, sell to the general public, on a securities exchange, for the first time. Through this process, a private company transforms into a public company. Initial public offerings are mostly used by companies to raise the expansion of capital, possibly to monetize the investments of early private investors, and to become publicly traded enterprises. A company selling shares is never required to repay the capital to its public investors. After the IPO, when shares trade freely in the open market, money passes between public investors. Although IPO offers many advantages, there are also significant disadvantages, chief among these are the costs associated with the process and the requirement to disclose certain information that could prove helpful to competitors. The IPO process is colloquially known as going public.

Investopedia

IPOs can be a risky investment. For the individual investor, it is tough to predict what the stock will do on its initial day of trading and in the near future because there is often little historical data with which to analyze the company. Also, most IPOs are of companies going through a transitory growth period, which are subject to additional uncertainty regarding their future values.

Recent Highly Publicized IPO Results and Returns

Obviously, the following table from MktOutperform (Charlie Bilello, CMT) is outdated the moment he sent it out, but the point is still the same, you likely don’t know shit about the IPO market:

IPO

Or as an embedded Tweet

Why is it likely that You (or I) don’t Know Shit about the IPO Market

Some of those equities have been public for a few years now, but the overall problem with buying an equity early in its public life is that the normal, retail investor is unlikely to know the the real money’s intent, deal or details with regards to their shares.  What do I mean by real money? Hedge funds, pensions, private equity and mutual funds. I would guess that

Some common reasons for a drop despite nothing actually changing with the underlying business:

  • You buy shares on 1/1 but on 1/9 key executives/employees come out of restricted status and they flood the market. Same thing can happen for the real money’s shares
  • Real money decides one day that they don’t like the metrics and/or growth (or lack thereof) which were originally built into the company.
  • The underwriters priced the initial offering incorrectly.

Just like anything risky real money can be made with IPOs, but I tend to keep myself a bit safer as I don’t have the risk tolerance.

 

By | 2016-04-20T21:58:05+00:00 February 16th, 2016|Investments|1 Comment

About the Author:

Evan is the owner of My Journey to Millions which was started to track his journey from a broke debt ridden law school graduate to building a positive balance. Need more Evan? Follow him on Twitter, Contact him or get new posts directly to your email

One Comment

  1. Matan October 14, 2016 at 8:44 am - Reply

    Nice one!
    I agree with you that the IPO market is very volatile, and it is not for everyone. That’s why it is important to diversify your investments.
    but if you want to take some part of the “celebration”, you can buy an ETF that try to replicate as closely as possible, before fees and expenses, the price and yield of a U.S. Index.
    you can explore all the details at their site if you want: http://www.ftportfolios.com/retail/etf/etfsummary.aspx?Ticker=FPX

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