Do You Need a Boiler Repair or Do you Need to Take More Control?

boiler

If your heating system is coming on too often or infrequently, you may believe that you need a boiler repair to get your equipment working as it should.   However, a badly-behaving boiler may not need to be fixed at all, and solving an issue may simply be a case of taking more control.

How Does a Boiler Work?

Boilers are operated using a number of controls which cover difference aspects of their function, and knowing how to use these properly is important.

One key piece of kit is your thermostat. This device regulates the temperature of a system at a desired setting.  It’s common to turn up the dial in winter and whack it down in summer, although every household can have different ideas about the ideal level of warmth and comfort they need. Over time, thermostats can lose their accuracy, meaning they misread temperature settings and switch on or off at the wrong times of the day.  If this is happening to you, there’s two clear options in front of you – fix or replace.

A Gas Safe engineer will be able to clean and recalibrate a thermostat, getting the settings back on track and ensuring your home is heated when you want it to be. However, if your thermostat has been around for a few years, it might be time to invest in a new, energy-saving one. This can cut between 10 and 20 per cent from your bills, meaning it could soon pay for itself.

Many boilers also have programmers and timer switches, which turn the heating on at set periods of the day. If the dial is stuck then the programming could be out of kilter. It’s also worth ensuring that the electronic programmers haven’t failed – if this has happened, you may need a new programmer.

When purchasing this piece of equipment, make sure it’s got a universal backplate, which makes replacements in the future simpler and means you may not need to call in an expert to carry out the work. Of course, one way you can ensure your home is always as warm as you want it to be is to have boiler insurance in place, meaning problems can be fixed as soon as they occur. Without proper training and being on the Gas Safe Register (a legal requirement for those wanting to work with gas) no one expects you to be an expert.

Whether it’s a boiler breakdown or a programming nightmare, with this type of cover in place you can enjoy the peace of mind that a fully trained engineer will be on the way soon to get things sorted.

Maintaining Furnaces and Boilers

Additionally, the federal government provides easy tips to maintaining your system,

  • Check the condition of your vent connection pipe and chimney. Parts of the venting system may have deteriorated over time. Chimney problems can be expensive to repair, and may help justify installing new heating equipment that won’t use the existing chimney.
  • Check the physical integrity of the heat exchanger. Leaky boiler heat exchangers leak water and are easy to spot. Furnace heat exchangers mix combustion gases with house air when they leak—an important safety reason to have them inspected.
  • Adjust the controls on the boiler or furnace to provide optimum water and air temperature settings for both efficiency and comfort.
  • If you’re considering replacing or retrofitting your existing heating system, have the technician perform a combustion-efficiency test.

This post is a Guest Post from HomeServe

6 Responses to Do You Need a Boiler Repair or Do you Need to Take More Control?

  1. Very useful info regarding the boilers. Hopefully I’ll remember this info when I buy that first house (which will be soon!).

  2. This is timely. My boiler died this morning! I didn’t realize it until I stepped into a freezing shower. You have never seen a woman move so fast. It’s 30 degrees outside and it was 64 inside so yep. Anyway I had to get to work, and BF made arrangements with Sears for a new one. It will cost us $1,200 plus tax. Sigh. We’re desperate. What else can we do?

  3. Newer water heaters are absurdly expensive! One reason, a plumber told me, is that gas heaters now have safety equipment that’s supposed to minimize the chance that they’ll cause an explosive fire when some moron opens up a can of gasoline next to one of them and lets the fumes permeate the air. It’s another of those annoying protect-you-from-yourself costs. But considering the horrific injuries that have resulted from people’s antics, I suppose it’s worth it. Sort of.

    Your post reminds me that I need to ask the handyman or the plumber to drain and refill my water heater, a task that should be done about every six months in areas where the water’s really hard.

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